Richard Cushing

His Eminence
Richard James Cushing

Cardinal, Archbishop emeritus of Boston

See
Boston

Installed
September 25, 1944

Term ended
September 8, 1970

Predecessor
William Henry O’Connell

Successor
Humberto Sousa Medeiros

Other posts
Cardinal-Priest of Santa Susanna

Orders

Ordination
May 26, 1921
by William Henry O’Connell

Consecration
June 29, 1939
by William Henry O’Connell

Created Cardinal
December 15, 1958
by John XXIII

Rank
Cardinal-Priest

Personal details

Birth name
Richard James Cushing

Born
(1895-08-24)August 24, 1895
Boston, Massachusetts

Died
November 2, 1970(1970-11-02) (aged 75)
Boston, Massachusetts

Previous post

Auxiliary Bishop of Boston (1939-1944)

Motto
UT COGNOSCANT TE
(THAT THEY MAY KNOW THEE)

Coat of arms

Ordination history of Richard Cushing

Episcopal consecration

Principal consecrator
William Henry O’Connell (Boston)

Date of consecration
June 29, 1939

Bishops consecrated by Richard Cushing as principal consecrator

Edward Francis Ryan
January 3, 1945

Louis Francis Kelleher
June 8, 1945

John Joseph Wright
June 30, 1947

Eric Francis MacKenzie
September 14, 1950

Thomas Francis Markham
September 14, 1950

Jeremiah Francis Minihan
September 8, 1954

George Hamilton Pearce
June 29, 1956

Harold William Henry
May 11, 1957

Jaime Antônio Schuck
February 24, 1959

Thomas Joseph Riley
December 21, 1959

William John McNaughton
August 21, 1961

Samuel Emmanuel Carter
April 25, 1966

James Burke, O.P.
May 25, 1967

Daniel Anthony Cronin
September 12, 1968

Richard James Cushing (August 24, 1895 – November 2, 1970) was an American prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. He served as Archbishop of Boston from 1944 to 1970, and was created a cardinal in 1958. Cushing’s main role was as fundraiser and builder of new churches, schools, and institutions. He was on good terms with practically the entire Boston elite, as he softened the traditional confrontation between the Catholic Irish and the Protestant upper-class. Cushing built useful relationships with Jews, Protestants, and institutions outside the usual Catholic community. He helped presidential candidate John F. Kennedy deflect fears of papal interference in American government if a Catholic became president. Cushing’s high energy level allowed him to meet with many people all day, often giving lengthy speeches at night. Cushing was not efficient at business affairs, and when expenses built up